Ford 6.0 03-07

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The 7.3 L (444 CID) Power Stroke was replaced by the 6.0 L (365 CID) midway through the 2003 model year. The 6.0L Power Stroke was used in Ford Super Duty trucks until the 2008 model year but lasted until 2009 in Ford Econoline vans (Model year 2010). The engine has a 3.74 in (95 mm) bore and 4.13 in (105 mm) stroke creating a displacement of 365 cu in (6.0 L) or 5954 cc. It utilizes a variable geometry turbocharger and intercooler, producing 325 hp (242 kW) and 570 lb·ft (773 N·m) with an 18:1 compression ratio, with fuel cutoff at 4200 rpm, but having a redline of 4500 rpm only attainable with aftermarket performance programming.

Some of the 6.0 L Power Stroke engines have proven to be problematic, and speculated to have cost Ford millions of dollars in warranty repairs and buy backs. They led to many recalls and the repurchase of at least 500 trucks, particularly in the first year. However, aftermarket parts exist to address these issues and, with them installed, the 6.0L engine's reliability improves greatly.

Key specifications

  • Fuel Injection system: Split Shot HEUI (Hydraulic Electronic Unit Injectors)
  • Valve Train: OHV 4-valve
  • Turbo configuration: Single Variable Vane Geometry (VGT)

Design problems

Intake & Exhaust

Some of the problems encountered, was the possibility of the variable geometry turbo charger to stick due to carbon deposits and/or rust buildup. This could potentially cause over boost and under boost conditions, which could lead to headgasket failure. Other problems include sticking Exhaust gas recirculation valves, restricted oil coolers, which lead to leaking EGR coolers, and in turn blown headgasket.

  • Carbon deposits can be a issue with any engine with EGR, but had a tendency to lead to a Domino effect of problems for the 6.0.
  • Proper cleaning of the coolant system is very important. With dirty coolant the sludge in the coolant will get lodged in the oil cooler, not only restricting adequate cooling of your engine oil but also restricts coolant into the EGR cooler causing it to crack do to high heat. The main sign of a blown EGR cooler is noticing a lose of coolant in your degas bottle as well as white smoke coming from your exhaust. If enough coolant entered the engine, it would stretch the head bolts allowing the head gaskets to blow. These trucks mainly got a bad reputation because of repeat failures. These repeat failures were due to improper service bulletins. When Ford first started experiencing problems with the EGR coolers, it was not standard procedure to also replace the oil cooler. This led to many repeat failures until Ford found the domino effect and implemented new standards for fixing the trucks.

Cylinder head

The major problems with the 6.0L was the torque-to-yield head bolts, which in an overboost condition would lead to a blown head gasket, and eventually a cracked cylinder head. The 7.3 and 6.7 Power Stroke engines both have 6 head bolts per cylinder (as well as the 6.9 and 7.3 International Harvester IDI engines). By contrast, the 6.0 only has 4 head bolts per cylinder.

Electrical & Fuel

Numerous PCM recalibrations, fuel injector stiction along with several other driveability and QC problems have been problems for the 6.0 as well. The FICM (Fuel Injection Control Module) has been a problem.

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